License Statement

Background

Unless otherwise noted, all content (i.e., original contribution) on this site is copyrighted by the authors of the content (as usual).

"Copyright" just means that the copyright holders (in our case, the authors themselves) reserve the exclusive right to copy and disseminate the work. This implies that any other party cannot copy and disseminate the work themselves, unless they receive permission by the holder to do so.

That's where licensing comes in.

By the way, don't be concerned of "legalese" when you encounter such terms as "license" or "licensing." It's really rather simple. When you see the word "license", think "permission." That's essentially what it means anyway.

So, here is our license.

The M6 Peeps License

Copyright 2011-2017 the-m6 peeps

You have permission to share these writings

You may share our writings and other content such as code ("our work",
or "the work").  Unless otherwise noted on a particular page of this
site (the-m6.net), we, the authors at this site and copyright holders
of our work ("The M6 Peeps" or "the-m6 peeps"), grant you permission
to copy and disseminate our work, in whole or in part, any way you
choose, so long as you do not edit our work (i.e., do not change its
content) and that you give correct attribution (i.e., state expressly
who authored the work).

You have permission to use the code in these writings

Unless otherwise noted on a particular page of this site, you may use
any of the code snippets found in our work in your own software, and
in that case, we consider those code snippets to be in, or of, the
public domain.  Also, in this case, we don't not expect for you to
give attribution.

No warranty for you!

Finally, we make no warranty of any kind for the use, or usage, of the
technology that is contained in our works ("the technology"), whether
expressed in terms of natural language or of a programming language
(i.e., code), or implied by such, and we shall not be liable for your
use, or usage, of the technology.  Your use, or usage, of the
technology is solely your responsibility.

Motivation and Further Comments

Motivation

Why such a liberal license? It's really simple: we would like for you to share the information we produce with as many people as possible. Maybe you want to cache a copy of a blog post here on your site. Go for it! If your site gets more traffic than ours, more people will read the content. Same story if your site doesn't, because it will likely have a different readership which just translates to a few more people reading the content. Still a win!

Please link back here

When you copy our work, verbatim in whole or verbatim in part, we'd prefer if you also linked back to it; however, you are not required by us in the license to do so. We leave that up to you.

Let's encourage a world of responsible adults

We are sorry we have to express this in the license, but there are many — shall we say — "non-adults" living among us: you use any technology you find on "the interwebs" at your own risk. This just stands to reason and propriety. There are, after all, manifold analogs of this in "meatspace."

If you're the kind of person who writes code by doing something similar to merely cutting-and-pasting from such sites as stackoverflow, when that code ends up burning your ass, we are all doing the "Snoopy dance" over here.

snoopydance

Figure 1: Snoopy dances hard when cut-and-paste idiots get burned.

Why don't you just take the time and develop your craft instead? Stop being a dead weight on society already.

A suggestion on how to make/give attribution

At the time of this writing at least, we don't tend to put our full names on the bylines. Instead, we tend to use names that are short and all lowercase, like Unix system logins, e.g. bilbo.

When you attribute our work in your own writings, you can write the author's name in your attribution in roughly the vein or style of any of the following examples.

  • bilbo@the-m6.net
  • bilbo at the-m6.net
  • bilbo, the-m6.net

We also don't see anything wrong with capitalizing the login-like name, e.g., using "Bilbo" instead of "bilbo" in any of the above examples.

Bottom line

We could have summarized the foregoing as: "Please share this, but don't be a jackass."

Questions/Comments

Feel free to send any questions about the foregoing to admin@youknowwhatthedomainname.is.